Wednesday, September 17, 2014

The Lesson - What blessings does Heavenly Father promise if I obey the commandments? - What I did.

Demonstrate to the youth how to identify promised blessings by reading with the class the “Message to the Youth from the First Presidency” in For the Strength of Youth (pages ii–iii). Invite the youth to raise their hands every time they hear a promised blessing. Why are these promises important to the youth?

OUR DEAR YOUNG MEN AND YOUNG WOMEN, we have great confidence in you. You are beloved sons and daughters of God and He is mindful of you. You have come to earth at a time of great opportunities and also of great challenges. The standards in this booklet will help you with the important choices you are making now and will yet make in the future. We promise that as you keep the covenants you have made and these standards, you will be blessed with the companionship of the Holy Ghost, your faith and testimony will grow stronger, and you will enjoy increasing happiness.


In all that you do, stay focused on the temple. In the temple you will receive the greatest of all the Lord’s blessings, including marriage for time and all eternity. Keeping the standards in this booklet will help you be worthy to attend the temple, where you can perform sacred ordinances for your ancestors now and make essential covenants for yourself in the future.

Our Father in Heaven has placed great trust in you. He has a work for you to do. Seek His guidance in prayer, and counsel with your parents and leaders. The decisions you make now will set the course for much of what will follow during your mortal life and throughout eternity.


We testify that God lives. It is our fervent prayer that you will remain steadfast and valiant throughout your lives and that you will trust in the Savior and His promises. As you do this, you will be an influence for good in helping to build the kingdom of God and prepare the world for the Second Coming of the Savior.


  • On one side of the board, write “Commandments,” and on the other side write “Promised Blessings.” Invite the youth to look for places in the scriptures where the Lord promises blessings to those who obey His commandments. For example, they could look in the scriptures suggested in this outline. Or, if necessary, show them how to use the Topical Guide to find scriptures about a commandment. Invite them to write on the board the commandment they read about and the promised blessings they found. How does reading about these blessings make them feel about the commandments?
I tweaked this one a little.  I did a little of the legwork ahead of time, using the some of the scriptures listed at the top of the lesson that were associated specifically with blessings for obedience in the scriptures.  Then I gave each kid a different sheety with a different scripture on each one.

Finding Blessings for Obedience in the Scriptures

Directions:  Read Isaiah 58:6-11.  Write on the board the commandment you read about and the promised blessings you found.



Finding Blessings for Obedience in the Scriptures

Directions:  Read Malachi 3:10-12.  Write on the board the commandment you read about and the promised blessings you found.



Finding Blessings for Obedience in the Scriptures

Directions:  Read D&C 59:9-20.  Write on the board the commandment you read about and the promised blessings you found.



Finding Blessings for Obedience in the Scriptures

Directions:  Read D&C 89:18-20.  Write on the board the commandment you read about and the promised blessings you found.

This is all I can find in my files!  I'm so sorry!  Perhaps this took all of the time?  I wish I had time to come up with more ideas for you, but I have chemo early in the morning and need to hit the sack. Wish me luck, okay?

The Lesson - How do the commandments help me learn to become more like Heavenly Father? - What I Did.

Ack, it's so hard to try to remember what I did with all of these, but I just want to get them up so that people can use them!

Okay, so I think I did the following thing as an attention-getting activity.  I gave them this recipe and told them there were some ingredients missing.  It's an easy chocolate chip cookie recipe and I figured that some of them had made cookies before.  Here is the right recipe:

Original Nestle® Toll House® Chocolate Chip Cookies








Servings: 60
Ingredients:
2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup butter or margarine, softened
3/4 cup granulated sugar
3/4 cup packed brown sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 large egg
1 (12 ounce) package NESTLE® TOLL
HOUSE® Semi-Sweet Chocolate
Morsels
1 cup chopped nuts, optional
Directions:
1.
PREHEAT oven to 375 degrees F.
2.
COMBINE flour, baking soda and salt in small bowl. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Gradually beat in flour mixture. Stir in morsels and nuts. Drop by rounded tablespoon onto ungreased baking sheets.
3.
BAKE for 9 to 11 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on baking sheets for 2 minutes; remove to wire racks to cool completely.

Original Nestle® Toll House® Chocolate Chip Cookies


Servings: 60

I gave them one with something really important taken out, like maybe eggs or flour or something.  For some reason I don't have that file.  But you can do it easily, right?  Right!  Time is of the essence!  I have chemo tomorrow and won't be at the computer for several days, so we have to get these churned out like crazy today.

So I had them guess what was wrong with it.  I think maybe one of the girls guessed right.  I told them that you can't make a perfect cookie without all of the ingredients.  And then I said that you can't perfect yourself to become like Heavenly Father without the commandments - commandments are a lot like a recipe in that way.

  Ask half of the class to read the first paragraph of Elder D. Todd Christofferson’s talk “‘As Many as I Love, I Rebuke and Chasten,’” and ask the other half to read the second paragraph. Invite them to look in their paragraphs for answers to the question “Why has God given us commandments?” (They could also read Elder Robert D. Hales’s talk “If Thou Wilt Enter into Life, Keep the Commandments,” beginning with the paragraph that states, “Some may ask, ‘Why did the Lord give us commandments?’”) Discuss what they find. Invite the youth to make a list of attributes God has. 


So I gave each kid one of the three following handouts and had them do it:

Why Does the Lord Give Us Commandments?

Directions:  Read the following quote.  (Your quote may not be the same as another person's quote, just FYI.)  Answer the question that follows the quote.

Some may ask, “Why did the Lord give us commandments?”  In premortal councils, He determined that we, His spirit children, would be given commandments by which to live during our mortal lives...

These commandments are loving instructions provided by God our Father for our physical and spiritual well-being and happiness while in mortality. Commandments allow us to know the mind and will of God regarding our eternal progression. And they test our willingness to be obedient to His will.

The commandments are not a burden or a restriction. Every commandment of the Lord is given for our development, progress, and growth. The Prophet Joseph Smith taught: “God has designed our happiness. … He never will institute an ordinance or give a commandment to His people that is not calculated in its nature to promote that happiness which He has designed” (Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, sel. Joseph Fielding Smith [1976], 256).
                 Elder Robert D. Hales, “If Thou Wilt Enter Into Life, Keep the Commandments,” General Conference, April 1996

So, according to this quote, why does the Lord give us commandments?
  

Why Does the Lord Give Us Commandments?

Directions:  Read the following quote.  (Your quote may not be the same as another person's quote, just FYI.)  Answer the question that follows the quote.

Our Heavenly Father is a God of high expectations. His expectations for us are expressed by His Son, Jesus Christ, in these words: “I would that ye should be perfect even as I, or your Father who is in heaven is perfect” (3 Nephi 12:48). He proposes to make us holy so that we may “abide a celestial glory” (D&C 88:22) and “dwell in his presence” (Moses 6:57). He knows what is required, and so, to make our transformation possible, He provides His commandments and covenants, the gift of the Holy Ghost, and most important, the Atonement and Resurrection of His Beloved Son.
                 Elder D. Todd Christofferson, “As Many As I Love, I Rebuke and Chasten,” General Conference, April 2011, paragraph 1

So, according to this quote, why does the Lord give us commandments?
  

Why Does the Lord Give Us Commandments?

Directions:  Read the following quote.  (Your quote may not be the same as another person's quote, just FYI.)  Answer the question that follows the quote.

God’s purpose is that we, His children, may be able to experience ultimate joy, to be with Him eternally, and to become even as He is. Some years ago Elder Dallin H. Oaks explained: “The Final Judgment is not just an evaluation of a sum total of good and evil acts—what we have done. It is an acknowledgment of the final effect of our acts and thoughts—what we have become. It is not enough for anyone just to go through the motions. The commandments, ordinances, and covenants of the gospel are not a list of deposits required to be made in some heavenly account. The gospel of Jesus Christ is a plan that shows us how to become what our Heavenly Father desires us to become.”
                 Elder D. Todd Christofferson, “As Many As I Love, I Rebuke and Chasten,” General Conference, April 2011, paragraph 2

So, according to this quote, why does the Lord give us commandments?

Thennnn, we listed attributes that we think Heavenly Father has up on the board, all together.  The kids calling the attributes out and me writing them.

Then I put them into pairs and had them do the following:

Attributes and Commandments

Directions:  We've made a list of attributes of our Heavenly Father on the board.  Based on the following quote, I've written some attributes in the table below.  I've included some blank spaces to add more attributes that we had thought of and had written on the board. 

Working with a partner, I want you to think of commandments we are given that will help us to develop these attributes.  When you're thinking of commandments, think of alllll of them – the original 10, plus any others you can think of – tithing, Word of Wisdom, etc.  As you and your partner discuss, write the commandments in the row of your choice – many of these commandments could fit more than one attribute.

And then let's discuss how you filled out your table when you're done!

“God is perfect. He is a God of righteousness, with attributes such as love, mercy, charity, truth, power, faith, knowledge, and judgment. He has all power. He knows all things. He is full of goodness.”
                 Gospel Principles, Chapter 1:  Our Father in Heaven

Attributes of Heavenly Father
Commandments that Will Help Me Learn These Attributes
love


mercy


charity


truth


power


faith


knowledge


judgment












And that's it, folks!

The Lesson - How can I help others understand my standards? - What I Did

  • Invite the youth to make a list of questions that friends or family members have asked them about the Lord’s standards or commandments. How did the youth explain their standards? What do they wish they had done differently?
I gave these sheeties out at the beginning of class.  When they finished, we discussed them.
Questions and Answers

1.  Make a list of questions that friends or family members have asked you about the Lord’s standards or commandments.







2.  How did you explain your standards to your friends or family members? 






3.  Do you wish you had explained anything differently?

  • Bring to class several copies of the New Era or Liahona. Invite the youth to search these magazines for stories that tell about people who had to defend or explain their standards to others. Ask them to share what they learn from these stories. (During the week before class, you may want to search a few issues of Church magazines to find copies that have articles that seem especially relevant to the youth you teach.) Do the youth have any similar experiences from their own lives that they could share? What do they learn from these experiences that can help them explain their standards to others?
I did a little bit of the legwork ahead of time, making another sheetie.  There are different sheets for each kiddo.  Then I had them share what they learned from these stories, and if anyone in the class had experiences like these.

Stories – Explaining Standards

Directions:  Read the following story from the New Era.  In the space underneath the story, write what you learned from the story.

Every day at lunch, a kid at Caleb Earnshaw’s school asks him, “So Caleb, when are you going to have sex?”

And every day, 15-year-old Caleb gives the same answer, “Not until I’m married.”

The next question is always, “Why?”

And it is the answer to this question that attracts the crowd. Caleb says, “I look at it as an opportunity. Every day, people gather around for the conversation, all these people sitting around us, listening intently. Every day I tell him about God’s plan for marriage. I’ve told him that way you never have regrets.”

Stories – Explaining Standards

Directions:  Read the following story from the New Era.  In the space underneath the story, write what you learned from the story.

For Sarah Ayer, 16, of the Laconia Ward, the subject of drinking has become a sticking point with some classmates. “Someone in my chemistry class asked me what would happen if I drank.

“They asked, ‘Would your parents disown you?’

“‘No, they wouldn’t do that,’ I answered.

“‘Then why don’t you just try?’

“‘Because it’s bad for you. God gave us the Word of Wisdom so we can know what is good and bad.’

Stories – Explaining Standards

Directions:  Read the following story from the New Era.  In the space underneath the story, write what you learned from the story.

It seems like one of the most difficult standards for these teens to convince their friends of is waiting to date until they are 16.

Elena Halley, 17, of the Ascutney Ward explained it this way: “They don’t get that we’re young. We have a very long time to date and get to know somebody we can consider marrying. I’ve seen a lot of couples who have dated too young end up sadly.”

Stories – Explaining Standards

Directions:  Read the following story from the New Era.  In the space underneath the story, write what you learned from the story.

One of the standards that causes a lot of discussion among Mitchell Mender's friends is not drinking.  Mitchell, 17, of the Lebanon Ward says, “My friends just can’t understand why I don’t want to have any ‘fun.’ A lot of times I tell them that I like being able to remember what I do. I see that a lot of them get into trouble. I tell them I don’t want to ruin my life like that. They know me and that I’m not going to give in.”


Stories – Explaining Standards

Directions:  Read the following story from the New Era.  In the space underneath the story, write what you learned from the story.

Seth Sansoucie, 15, of the Canterbury Ward says that it seems like everybody in his school swears. “Some ask why I don’t swear. I say it’s against my religion. My friends don’t swear a lot, but every once in awhile I’ll have to say, ‘Hey, watch it when I’m around.’”


Stories – Explaining Standards

Directions:  Read the following story from the New Era.  In the space underneath the story, write what you learned from the story.

Teens seem to love having the standards written down in the For the Strength of Youth pamphlet. They find it handy to give to friends and to refer to.

Megan E. Snyder, 17, of the Bedford Ward says, “I have the little one in my wallet, and I whip that out so many times. I love it.”

“My cousin has one, and he’s not Mormon,” says Olivia Searle, 16, of the Laconia Ward. “He carries it in his wallet. Lots of my friends have a copy.”

“They always find it really interesting,” says Elisabeth Earnshaw. “Some think that people don’t respect Mormon standards, but I find that if I ever discuss them with anyone, most of the time they are very accepting. They may not understand, but they respect someone who is able to follow those standards.”



Stories – Explaining Standards

Directions:  Read the following story from the New Era.  In the space underneath the story, write what you learned from the story.

In a lesson taught a few weeks ago in seminary, something really touched me and had a huge effect on me and my life. My teacher read aloud the Entertainment and Media section from For The Strength of Youth. There was one passage she kept repeating over and over again. It said, “Do not attend, view, or participate in entertainment that is vulgar, immoral, violent, or pornographic in any way. Do not participate in entertainment that in any way presents immorality or violent behavior as acceptable” ([2001], 17). As she said this over and over again, it started to sink into me.

Later that day at school, I was in my English lesson when my teacher said, “Today we are going to watch a film as a treat.” I really did not want to watch it because it was a scary and vulgar film. I knew that I would feel uncomfortable. I pulled my For the Strength of Youth pamphlet out of my bag and explained to my teacher that I have standards and that this film was inappropriate for me to watch. I was scared and nervous about what my teacher’s reply would be and how she would react to me for sticking up for my standards and what I believed in. She paused for a moment and then said, “Kelsey, I fully understand that you have standards, and I admire you for sticking up for your beliefs.” My teacher then told me that I could go to another room and get a head start on our next topic.

I appreciated my teacher for understanding, and I will always remember this experience. I now know that I can stick up for what I believe in and that the For the Strength of Youth pamphlet is a strong and powerful thing in my life and always will be.

Stories – Explaining Standards

Directions:  Read the following story from the New Era.  In the space underneath the story, write what you learned from the story.

Bright lights. Screaming crowds. Thousands of fans on Facebook. When 17-year-old Gerson Santos became a top-10 finalist in the Portuguese televised musical talent competition ├Źdolos, he had to adjust to the fame and attention that came with his success. Gerson decided to embrace this unique opportunity to preach the gospel and quickly became known across the Portuguese media as the “Mormon competitor” willing to answer questions about his faith.

Once during a dinner with the other contestants, we talked a little bit about religion, and I spoke about my faith and the standards of the Church. Later I gave each of the finalists a copy of the For the Strength of Youth pamphlet so they could better understand what I believe. Some said the Church’s standards seemed really conservative, but others praised me for having such high standards in these days.

  • Give each youth a copy of President Thomas S. Monson’s talk “Preparation Brings Blessings.” Ask the class members to quickly scan the talk, looking for the Church standards that he explains (such as modesty, honesty, and the Word of Wisdom). Invite each youth to select one of these standards, read what President Monson says about it, and share with the class how President Monson explains the standard and anything they find that they could use to help others understand this standard better.
Another sheetie.  This one has directions that are self-explanatory:



Preparation Brings Blessings

Directions:  Read what President Monson says about the following standard.  Be prepared to share with the class how President Monson explains the standard and anything you find that you could use to help others understand this standard better. 

In cultures where dating is appropriate, do not date until you are 16 years old. “Not all teenagers need to date or even want to. … When you begin dating, go in groups or on double dates. … Make sure your parents meet [and become acquainted with] those you date.” Because dating is a preparation for marriage, “date only those who have high standards.” 

Be careful to go to places where there is a good environment, where you won’t be faced with temptation.

A wise father said to his son, “If you ever find yourself in a place where you shouldn’t ought to be, get out!” Good advice for all of us.

Preparation Brings Blessings

Directions:  Read what President Monson says about the following standard.  Be prepared to share with the class how President Monson explains the standard and anything you find that you could use to help others understand this standard better.

Servants of the Lord have always counseled us to dress appropriately to show respect for our Heavenly Father and for ourselves. The way you dress sends messages about yourself to others and often influences the way you and others act. Dress in such a way as to bring out the best in yourself and those around you. Avoid extremes in clothing and appearance, including tattoos and piercings.

Preparation Brings Blessings

Directions:  Read what President Monson says about the following standard.  Be prepared to share with the class how President Monson explains the standard and anything you find that you could use to help others understand this standard better.

The oft-repeated adage is ever true: “Honesty [is] the best policy.”  A Latter-day Saint young man lives as he teaches and as he believes. He is honest with others. He is honest with himself. He is honest with God. He is honest by habit and as a matter of course. When a difficult decision must be made, he never asks himself, “What will others think?” but rather, “What will I think of myself?”


Preparation Brings Blessings

Directions:  Read what President Monson says about the following standard.  Be prepared to share with the class how President Monson explains the standard and anything you find that you could use to help others understand this standard better.

How you speak and the words you use tell much about the image you choose to portray. Use language to build and uplift those around you. Profane, vulgar, or crude language and inappropriate or off-color jokes are offensive to the Lord. Never misuse the name of God or Jesus Christ. The Lord said, “Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain.” 

Preparation Brings Blessings

Directions:  Read what President Monson says about the following standard.  Be prepared to share with the class how President Monson explains the standard and anything you find that you could use to help others understand this standard better.

Our Heavenly Father has counseled us to seek after “anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy.” 5 Whatever you read, listen to, or watch makes an impression on you.
Pornography is especially dangerous and addictive. Curious exploration of pornography can become a controlling habit, leading to coarser material and to sexual transgression. Avoid pornography at all costs.

Don’t be afraid to walk out of a movie, turn off a television set, or change a radio station if what’s being presented does not meet your Heavenly Father’s standards. In short, if you have any question about whether a particular movie, book, or other form of entertainment is appropriate, don’t see it, don’t read it, don’t participate.

Preparation Brings Blessings

Directions:  Read what President Monson says about the following standard.  Be prepared to share with the class how President Monson explains the standard and anything you find that you could use to help others understand this standard better.

The Apostle Paul declared: “Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you? … The temple of God is holy, which temple ye are.” Brethren, it is our responsibility to keep our temples clean and pure.

Hard drugs, wrongful use of prescription drugs, alcohol, coffee, tea, and tobacco products destroy your physical, mental, and spiritual well-being. Any form of alcohol is harmful to your spirit and your body. Tobacco can enslave you, weaken your lungs, and shorten your life.

Preparation Brings Blessings

Directions:  Read what President Monson says about the following standard.  Be prepared to share with the class how President Monson explains the standard and anything you find that you could use to help others understand this standard better.

Music can help you draw closer to your Heavenly Father. It can be used to educate, edify, inspire, and unite. However, music can, by its tempo, beat, intensity, and lyrics, dull your spiritual sensitivity. You cannot afford to fill your minds with unworthy music.
  

Preparation Brings Blessings

Directions:  Read what President Monson says about the following standard.  Be prepared to share with the class how President Monson explains the standard and anything you find that you could use to help others understand this standard better.
Because sexual intimacy is so sacred, the Lord requires self-control and purity before marriage as well as full fidelity after marriage. In dating, treat your date with respect and expect your date to show that same respect for you. Tears inevitably follow transgression.

Ask each class member to read one of the scriptures in this outline. Invite the youth to find words and phrases that indicate what our attitude should be when we explain our standards to others. 

Words, Words, Words

Read the following scripture. (Your scripture is different than anyone else's in the class.)  Find words and phrases in the scripture that indicate what our attitude should be when we explain our standards to others.   Jot the words and phrases down underneath the scripture on this worksheet.

Romans 1:16  

Words, Words, Words

Read the following scripture. (Your scripture is different than anyone else's in the class.)  Find words and phrases in the scripture that indicate what our attitude should be when we explain our standards to others.   Jot the words and phrases down underneath the scripture on this worksheet.

2 Timothy 1:7-8  

Words, Words, Words

Read the following scripture. (Your scripture is different than anyone else's in the class.)  Find words and phrases in the scripture that indicate what our attitude should be when we explain our standards to others.   Jot the words and phrases down underneath the scripture on this worksheet.

2 Ne 8:7  

Words, Words, Words

Read the following scripture. (Your scripture is different than anyone else's in the class.)  Find words and phrases in the scripture that indicate what our attitude should be when we explain our standards to others.   Jot the words and phrases down underneath the scripture on this worksheet.

1 Timothy 4:12  

Words, Words, Words

Read the following scripture. (Your scripture is different than anyone else's in the class.)  Find words and phrases in the scripture that indicate what our attitude should be when we explain our standards to others.   Jot the words and phrases down underneath the scripture on this worksheet.

3 Ne 11:29 

Words, Words, Words

Read the following scripture. (Your scripture is different than anyone else's in the class.)  Find words and phrases in the scripture that indicate what our attitude should be when we explain our standards to others.   Jot the words and phrases down underneath the scripture on this worksheet.

D&C 11:21 

Words, Words, Words

Read the following scripture. (Your scripture is different than anyone else's in the class.)  Find words and phrases in the scripture that indicate what our attitude should be when we explain our standards to others.   Jot the words and phrases down underneath the scripture on this worksheet.

D&C 84:85 

Words, Words, Words

Read the following scripture. (Your scripture is different than anyone else's in the class.)  Find words and phrases in the scripture that indicate what our attitude should be when we explain our standards to others.   Jot the words and phrases down underneath the scripture on this worksheet.

D&C 100:5-8

And that's it! 

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Guess who got Botox today??

Me, that's 'oo.  (What movie??)  Yep, you read that right.

Ya know, this whole cancer thing has completely changed my thoughts about a few things.  For one thing, it's made me less judgmental.  I mean, I'm not really a judgey person to begin with - let me just put that out there for you.  Judgeyness is seriously my biggest pet peeve of ALL TIME.  But I suppose, in the deep recesses of my brain, I have judged certain behaviors in a bad light.

For instance, until I accidentally took my son's ADHD meds and felt like a freakin' ROCK STAR for like four hours (before crashing and burning and having this major paranoia/panic attack thing), I thought, "Oh, women who take their kids' ADHD meds...wow, that's messed up...." But when I experienced that euphoria?  I was like, Oh.  I can see why this happens.  They want to feel like a million bucks and get every dang thing done in record time.  I see the draw.  I'm not saying I'm going to keep doing it, or that it's a very good idea for people to do it, but I can see how, in a moment of desperation, a person would want that.

Or pain pills.  It kicked my buttocks flesh (my favorite phrase that a yoga instructor of mine used to always use, before I got all ADD and started jogging instead.  And then got all ADD and started dancing.  Before yoga, it was spinning.  It changes all the time) to get off those suckers.  It was more of an emotional withdrawal than physical!  But before that experience, I was all, "Oh, people who get hooked on pain pills...wow, that's messed up..."   And now I get it.  I totally get it.  Still not saying it's a good idea, but does anyone ever set out to get addicted to pain pills?  No.

And plastic surgery.  I was all, "I'm not ever having fake boobs."  (Well, obvi, my life plans changed dramatically this summer.)  And now that I have them, I LOVE THEM!  They don't bounce, you guys!  I mean, maybe when they take my "stretchers" out and put in my real implants (I think this happens after radiation, so, like, April?), they'll bounce?  But I know that they put the stretchers, and then the implants that replace the stretchers, under your pecs.  And I'm not kidding, you guys.  I taught ballet last week and did a whole petite allegro sequence for like half an hour, and these things didn't move an INCH.  Petite allegro is very, very bouncy.  They didn't move an inch.  I wasn't even wearing a bra!!!  I don't have to wear a bra!  And nobody knows!  And my boobs are just so...perky! This has really been such a pleasant surprise.

And Botox.  I was always like, "I'm going to grow old gracefully.  No Botox for me.  No siree.  I want to look authentic."

But then here's the deal - my right eyelid has been twitching almost constantly since my diagnosis. So, um, almost two full months.  It will sometimes pause, but like a minute later, there it goes.  I don't know if it's stress, or lack of sleep (I don't sleep very well since my diagnosis) or what, but it's driving me CRAZY.  I mentioned it to my plastic surgeon (I have a plastic surgeon now) the last time they filled my boobs up a little, and he was like, "If your eye is still bugging you in two weeks, let's put some Botox in it!" I guess he does that all the time for people whose eyelids are wigging out on them.

Today was my final fill-er-up, and I was like, "Um, so, my eyelid.  Still twitching."

And he was all, "Let's Botox it!"

I was really nervous, but it only hurt as much as it would if you just kind of tapped your skin with the end of a tack.  For realsies.  I was like, "Oh!  Okay!  Cool!"  This is basically what I looked like when he did it:
Not really.  I looked more like this:

And then he goes, "I've got some left over in the vial.  Do you want me to put some anywhere else?"

And boy howdy, instead of demurely putting up my hand, stop-in-the-name-of-love style, and saying, "No, sir.  I shall not sully my face.  I shall grow old gracefully..." I was immediately like, "YES!  SHOOT IT UP BETWEEN MY EYEBROWS!!!"

Because you see, my skin is usually nice and oily, right?  And you don't see many wrinkles on me, on account of its suppleness.  It happens to come with wicked acne, so don't get too jealous.  But since chemo, well, lots of things have changed.  One thing is that I'm growing peach fuzz all over my forehead and jowls.  I have to shave my peach fuzz, for Pete's sake.  I could list a billion other things that have changed.  But notably, my oily, acne-prone face is now a dry, wrinkly pruneface.  And my frown lines between my eyebrows are REALLY prominent.

So yeah.  My views on Botox have changed dramatically, apparently.  It's supposed to take effect in a couple of days.  I'm a little excited to see what happens with my eyelid and with my frown lines.

And my boobs?  They're gorgeous.  Mainly.  They're bigger than they were before, but not crazy big and weird.  Just...nice and proportional.  Proportional for my body type.  They are really lopsided right now, so we'll have to make adjustments, I suppose.  Lefty is higher and smaller than righty, even though equal amounts of...whatever it is they put in the stretchers...have been put into each side. I'm sure my plastic surgeon will take care of it.  He says that Righty "dropped."  I made a lame-o joke about it expecting its baby any day now.  He laughed.  He's very kind to put up with my dorky jokes. We're going to take a prayerful watch-and-wait stance on the lopsided boob issue.  (What movie?)   Maybe Lefty will also "drop" a little to match Righty.  We shall see.  If not, I trust my plastic surgeon.  It's his job to make things pretty.  So I'll let him do it.

The Lesson - Why is it important to learn about my family history?

Making Connections – Family History

1.               Write down a gospel principle that they recently learned from a parent, sibling, or other family member.






2.               Write down any experiences you have had doing family history work (such as being baptized for an ancestor, participating in indexing, or preparing the name of an ancestor for temple ordinances).






3.               Why does Heavenly Father want us to do family history work?

We did exactly as the lesson asked us to do with the Richard G. Scott part.  I gave each kid a copy of the last few paragraphs of his talk:


The Joy of Redeeming the Dead

“Any work you do in the temple is time well spent, but receiving ordinances vicariously for one of your own ancestors will make the time in the temple more sacred, and even greater blessings will be received. The First Presidency has declared, 'Our preeminent obligation is to seek out and identify our own ancestors.'

“Do you young people want a sure way to eliminate the influence of the adversary in your life? Immerse yourself in searching for your ancestors, prepare their names for the sacred vicarious ordinances available in the temple, and then go to the temple to stand as proxy for them to receive the ordinances of baptism and the gift of the Holy Ghost. As you grow older, you will be able to participate in receiving the other ordinances as well. I can think of no greater protection from the influence of the adversary in your life.

“In the Russia Rostov-na-Donu Mission the youth were invited to each index 2,000 names and then qualify at least one name from their own families for temple ordinances. Those who accomplished this goal were invited to go on a long journey to the new Kyiv Ukraine Temple. One young man shared his experience: 'I was spending a lot of time playing computer games. When I started indexing, I didn’t have time to play games. At first I thought, “Oh no! How can that be!” When this project was over, I even lost interest in gaming. … Genealogical work is something that we can do here on earth, and it will remain in heaven.'”

                 Elder Richard G. Scott, “The Joy of Redeeming the Dead,” October 2012 General Conference

Important/Not Important

I have all of these images in this file, and I think I printed them out and put them in a grab bag.  Then I had each kid draw a picture out of there, and I had two areas on the ground in front of them with stand-up cards labeled "Important" and "Not Important."  I had each kid say what the picture showed and put it in the pile.  It seems like a dumb activity, but it helped to kind of get them moving and not so sedate, and they actually really liked it.  Here are the images (I feel like I had a ton more, but they aren't in my file.  Just google stuff that you think isn't worthwhile and then google family history stuff and print those images out so that each of your students gets something out of the grab bag):

 (this is a picture of indexing):


Then we did exactly what the lesson suggested on the Redeeming the Dead and Your Responsibilities part.  Here are my sheeties for that:

Redeeming the Dead

Many of Heavenly Father’s children have died without having the opportunity to receive the fulness of the gospel. In His mercy and infinite love, the Lord has prepared a way for them to gain a testimony of the gospel and receive the saving ordinances of the priesthood.

In the spirit world, the gospel is “preached to those who [have] died in their sins, without a knowledge of the truth, or in transgression, having rejected the prophets. These [are] taught faith in God, repentance from sin, vicarious baptism for the remission of sins, the gift of the Holy Ghost by the laying on of hands, and all other principles of the gospel that [are] necessary for them to know in order to qualify themselves that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit” (D&C 138:32–34).

Many in the spirit world embrace the gospel. However, they cannot receive priesthood ordinances for themselves because they do not have physical bodies. In holy temples, we have the privilege of receiving ordinances in their behalf. These ordinances include baptism, confirmation, Melchizedek Priesthood ordination (for men), the endowment, the marriage sealing, and the sealing of children to parents. The Lord revealed this work to the Prophet Joseph Smith, restoring a practice that had been revealed to Christians shortly after the Resurrection of Jesus Christ (see 1 Corinthians 15:29).

As you receive priesthood ordinances in behalf of those who have died, you become a savior on Mount Zion for them (see Obadiah 1:21). Your effort approaches the spirit of the Savior’s atoning sacrifice—you perform a saving work for others that they cannot do for themselves.


Your Responsibilities in Family History Work

In family history work, you have three basic responsibilities:

1. Receive the temple ordinances for yourself and help immediate family members receive them.

2. Hold a current temple recommend and attend the temple as frequently as circumstances allow.

3. Gather family history information so you can help your ancestors receive the blessings of the temple.

You can participate in temple and family history work, at least to some extent, regardless of where you live or what your circumstances are. While you probably will not be able to do everything, you can do something. The following ideas may help you get started:

Record important details about your own life. Record your birth date and birthplace and the dates of your baptism and confirmation. Keep a personal journal to record the highlights of your life, including personal experiences that will strengthen the faith of your children and other future generations.

Learn about your ancestors. Begin by recording information from your memory and from accessible sources at home. Record the vital information you accurately remember or can find about siblings, parents, uncles and aunts, grandparents, and great-grandparents. Where possible, obtain copies of certificates or other documents that include this information. As you gather more information, you may want to search in other locations, such as public records. The local ward or branch may have a family history consultant who can help you. You may also want to visit the Church’s official Web site for family history, www.familysearch.org.

As you identify your ancestors, use pedigree charts and family group forms to record the information you find. These forms are available on paper and also in Church-produced software programs, such as Personal Ancestral File.

When you have gathered the necessary information about your ancestors who have died without receiving the gospel, ensure that temple work is performed for them.  Even if you do not live near enough to a temple for you and your family members to be able to do the ordinance work, you can submit ancestors’ names to a temple so others can do the work for them. You may be able to visit a nearby family history center or consult with local ward or branch family history consultants to see how to do this.

The Prophet Joseph Smith declared that there are “principles in relation to the dead and the living that cannot be lightly passed over, as pertaining to our salvation. For their salvation is necessary and essential to our salvation, as . . .they without us cannot be made perfect—neither can we without our dead be made perfect” (D&C 128:15). Through your participation in family history work, you and your ancestors progress toward salvation.

Then we watched the Elder Bednar video and I had the kids jot down their ideas on this worksheet as we watched:


Why Family History Is Important

1.


2.


3.


4.


5.


6.


The Lesson - What opportunities are there for learning and teaching in the home? - What I Did

Well, I can't see that I did any introductory stuff for this lesson.  I just started with the video clip, giving this sheety to my kids to fill in while they watched:


A Heaven-Inspired Program

Directions:  As you watch the video clip with President Monson, fill in the two lists below.


Dangers We Can Be Protected From                       Strengths that Can Come from

by Studying the Gospel as Families                          Studying the Gospel as Families


Then we discussed the worksheet, of course.  We always discuss, unless some of the stuff is private stuff for them to stick in their scriptures or journals or whatever.  But I always tell them on their sheeties if they'll need to share or not.  Then we did the following worksheet for the L.Tom Perry part.  I split his talk up and gave each kid a different worksheet:
Becoming Goodly Parents

Directions:  Read the following suggestion (From Elder Perry's talk from October 2012) for creating a stronger family culture.  After you read the suggestion, answer the questions that follow it.

“Parents can pray in earnest, asking our Eternal Father to help them love, understand, and guide the children He has sent to them.”

If you can think of one, share an example you have seen of a family following the suggestion.




What can you do now to prepare to follow this suggestion when you become a parent? 



Becoming Goodly Parents

Directions:  Read the following suggestion (From Elder Perry's talk from October 2012) for creating a stronger family culture.  After you read the suggestion, answer the questions that follow it.

“Families can hold family prayer, scripture study, and family home evenings and eat together as often as possible, making dinner a time of communication and the teaching of values.”

Share an example you have seen of a family following the suggestion.




2.  What can you do now to prepare to follow this suggestion when you become a parent?

  

Becoming Goodly Parents

Directions:  Read the following suggestion (From Elder Perry's talk from October 2012) for creating a stronger family culture.  After you read the suggestion, answer the questions that follow it.

“Parents can fully avail themselves of the Church’s support network, communicating with their children’s Primary teachers, youth leaders, and class and quorum presidencies. By communicating with those who are called and set apart to work with their children, parents can provide essential understanding of a child’s special and specific needs. “

1.  Share an example you have seen of a family following the suggestion.



2.  What can you do now to prepare to follow this suggestion when you become a parent?

  
Becoming Goodly Parents

Directions:  Read the following suggestion (From Elder Perry's talk from October 2012) for creating a stronger family culture.  After you read the suggestion, answer the questions that follow it.

“Parents can share their testimonies often with their children, commit them to keep the commandments of God, and promise the blessings that our Heavenly Father promises His faithful children.”

1.  Share an example you have seen of a family following the suggestion.



2.  What can you do now to prepare to follow this suggestion when you become a parent?


Becoming Goodly Parents

Directions:  Read the following suggestion (From Elder Perry's talk from October 2012) for creating a stronger family culture.  After you read the suggestion, answer the questions that follow it.

“We can organize our families based on clear, simple family rules and expectations, wholesome family traditions and rituals, and “family economics,” where children have household responsibilities and can earn allowances so that they can learn to budget, save, and pay tithing on the money they earn.”

1.  Share an example you have seen of a family following the suggestion.



2.  What can you do now to prepare to follow this suggestion when you become a parent?

Then we did the Proclamation on the Family activity.  I gave each kid a copy of the 7th paragraph of the Proclamation:

The family is ordained of God. Marriage between man and woman is essential to His eternal plan. Children are entitled to birth within the bonds of matrimony, and to be reared by a father and a mother who honor marital vows with complete fidelity. Happiness in family life is most likely to be achieved when founded upon the teachings of the Lord Jesus Christ. Successful marriages and families are established and maintained on principles of faith, prayer, repentance, forgiveness, respect, love, compassion, work, and wholesome recreational activities. By divine design, fathers are to preside over their families in love and righteousness and are responsible to provide the necessities of life and protection for their families. Mothers are primarily responsible for the nurture of their children. In these sacred responsibilities, fathers and mothers are obligated to help one another as equal partners. Disability, death, or other circumstances may necessitate individual adaptation. Extended families should lend support when needed.
                 The Family:  A Proclamation to the World

Then I did the Recreational Activities Part like so:


Wholesome Recreational Activities

1.  What recreational activities do you enjoy participating in with your families?



2.  What gospel truths or principles have you learned as you have taken part in these activities?

And then we shared our answers to this part.  [I put the picture of a boat at sunset, because I grew up on a boat - those were some of the best times of my life. :)]

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...